If Air Pollution Causes Alzheimer’s, Dementia and Parkinson’s, Why Are We Still in Denial?

 

 

 

 

 

When you think of factors that increase the risk of Alzheimer’s, dementia and Parkinson’s disease you probably think of genetics or traumatic brain injury. Even if you created a lengthy list of factors, you might never list air pollution—but more and more research shows that air pollution is involved in these brain diseases, which now affect 6 million Americans and 50 million people worldwide.

While we have known for years that air pollution increases the risk of asthma, lung infections and lung cancer, we are discovering that it is also linked to heart disease, depression, obesity and brain diseases. In a study published in the medical journal Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers assessed the effects of black carbon—a marker of traffic-related air pollution—on cognitive function and the central nervous systems of male study participants. The scientists found that there was a significant link between air pollution levels and a reduction in cognitive function, a worrisome result given our growing air pollution emissions.

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How we make decisions: Scientists identify the two brain mechanisms that control speed and accuracy

 

  • One increases amount of information needed when making accurate decisions
  • Other will lower the threshold, allowing us to make a quick decision
  • Study also found the pre-frontal cortex region contributes to decision making

Scientists have identified two distinct mechanisms in the human brain that control the balance between speed and accuracy when making decisions.

One network increases the amount of information needed to make accurate choices, while the other tends to lower this threshold for quick decision making.

The team believes these findings hold the key to developing better treatments for neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.

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Scientists identified two distinct mechanism in the brain that control the balance between speed and accuracy when making decisions. One increases the amount of information needed to make accurate choices, while the other  lowers this threshold for quick decision making

Scientists identified two distinct mechanism in the brain that control the balance between speed and accuracy when making decisions. One increases the amount of information needed to make accurate choices, while the other lowers this threshold for quick decision making.

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Exercise Can Be a Boon to People With Parkinson’s Disease

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Susan Sills, a Brooklyn artist who until recently made life-size cutouts on plywood using a power saw, long suspected she might be at risk for developing Parkinson’s disease. Both her mother and grandfather had this neurological movement disorder, and she knew that it sometimes runs in families.

So she was not surprised when at age 72 she first noticed hand tremors and a neurologist confirmed that she had the disease. But to watch her in action three years later, it would be hard for a layperson to tell. She stands straight, walks briskly, speaks in clarion tones and maintains a schedule that could tire someone half her age.

Having wisely put the power saw aside, Ms. Sills now makes intricately designed art jewelry. She is also a docent at the Brooklyn Museum, participates in a cooperative art gallery and assists her husband’s business by entertaining customers.

Ms. Sills attributes her energy and well-being partly to the medication she takes but primarily to the hours she spends working out with a physical therapist and personal trainer, who have helped her develop an exercise regimen that, while not a cure, can alleviate Parkinson’s symptoms and slow progression of the disease.

“The exercises opened me up,” said Ms. Sills, allowing such symptoms as small steps, slow movements and tiny, cramped handwriting to subside.

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How NICOTINE could help to prevent obesity and dementia: Drug ‘reduces appetite and slows the brain’s ageing’

Lo bueno de lo malo ???

When taken independently, nicotine - found in tobacco products - protects the brain as it ages by suppressing the desire to eat, scientists believe. But experts say smoking should still be avoided as it results in a vast array of health problems which outweigh the benefits of the drug

 

  • Nicotine protects the brain from ageing by suppressing the desire to eat
  • It allows people to consume less food and not put on as much weight
  • Brain shrinks naturally with age – but being obese makes it decline faster
  • Experts say smoking should still be avoided as it results in health problems

 

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NEUROSCIENTIST SHOWS WHAT FASTING DOES TO YOUR BRAIN & WHY BIG PHARMA WON’T STUDY IT

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Below is a TEDx talk given by Mark Mattson, the current Chief of the Laboratory of Neuroscience at the National Institute on Aging. He is also a professor of Neuroscience at The Johns Hopkins University, and one of the foremost researchers in the area of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying multiple neurodegenerative disorders, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. Leer Más



Sugar On The Brain? Fish Oil Can Help!

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You don’t have to be eating decadent cakes, processed candies, sugary sodas, and pints of ice cream to be eating large amounts of sugar, commonly in the form of corn syrup. You might be surprised to notice corn syrup in the ingredients of food such as breads, frozen pizzas, macaroni & cheese, cereal bars, cocktail peanuts, tonic water, salad dressing, apple sauce, and ketchup. In our fast-paced lives it is very difficult to avoid the myriad of foods that contain fructose. Even when we think we are feeding our families “healthy” food, it can still contain ingredients that have been found to be harmful. The good news is, studies have shown there are other nutrients that may help with the effects of fructose. Leer Más


The Benefits Of Cinnamon May Extend To Brain Power: How The Spice Helps Improve The Learning Process

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Imagine if all you had to do to unlock a better way to learn was sprinkle a delicious topping onto your food? A team of researchers from Rush University Medical Center believes ground cinnamon will do the trick to transform a poor learner into a good one. Their findings, published in the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology, reveal how the simple household spice is able to improve a vital protein that’s key to memory and learning. Leer Más