Love makes the heart grow stronger: Women with a steady heart rate have a greater chance of being in a relationship, researchers say

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scientists discovered that women with so-called low heart rate variability were nearly twice as likely to be in a relationship at the end of their six-month study as those with a high rate.

Women with a steady heart rate have a greater chance of being in a relationship, according to research.

One theory is that large variations in heart rate may be linked to the nervous system involved with emotions.

Scientists discovered that women with so-called low heart rate variability were nearly twice as likely to be in a relationship at the end of their six-month study as those with a high rate

The researchers, from Lakehead University in Canada, told Biological Psychology magazine: ‘Perhaps it is our heart and not our head that determines which of us will find love after all.’

Other research has shown that being generous to others can also help fight heart disease.

This is because altruistic acts decrease stress, which can contribute to the condition.

Volunteering can also help reduce blood pressure, having a positive affect on general wellbeing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

One theory is that large variations in heart rate may be linked to the nervous system involved with emotions.

Link Original: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4785634/Women-steady-heart-rate-chance-relationship.html?ITO=applenews


Drinking tea may alter women’s gene expression

It seems that we can’t get enough of tea; statistics show that almost 80 percent of households in the United States drink it. But do you know what this popular beverage does once it passes our lips? New research sheds some light on how tea affects gene expression.

Study leader Weronica Ek, of Uppsala University in Sweden, and colleagues found that drinking tea appears to trigger epigenetic changes in women that are associated with cancer and the metabolism of the hormone estrogen.

However, whether these epigenetic changes protect against cancer or drive the disease remain to be seen.

The researchers recently published their findings in the journal Human Molecular Genetics.

 

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Elevated brain blood flow linked to anxiety and mood symptoms in women

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Adolescence is a critical period for emotional maturation and is a time when significant symptoms of anxiety and depression can increase, particularly in females.

Prior work by a team of Penn Medicine researchers found that sex-specific changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) begin at puberty.

The team’s newest research shows that higher blood flow in emotional brain regions such as the amygdala is associated with higher levels of anxiety and mood symptoms in females.

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Do women talk more than men

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I recently did a survey of my male and female friends of varying age groups and posed this age-old question.

There was a sharp gender divide. Most of the men answered, “Yes” and then shut up while most of the women answered, “No” and then added their reasons for their belief which ranged from a comparatively pithy forty-seven words to a rather more loquacious six hundred and nineteen words. Leer Más