Centenarian study suggests living environment may be key to longevity

When it comes to living to the ripe old age of 100, good genes help, but don’t tell the full story. Where you live has a significant impact on the likelihood that you will reach centenarian age, suggests a new study conducted by scientists at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

Published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health and based on Washington State mortality data, the research team’s findings suggest that Washingtonians who live in highly walkable, mixed-age communities may be more likely to live to their 100th birthday. They also found to be correlated, and an additional analysis showed that geographic clusters where the probability of reaching age is high are located in and smaller towns with higher socioeconomic status, including the Seattle area and the region around Pullman, Wash.

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The synchrony between neurons in different brain hemispheres could aid behavioral adaptation

In order to survive and thrive, humans and other living organisms must continuously acquire new strategies to adapt their behavior to changing environments. Past studies suggest that the synchronization between different brain cells could create flexible brain states that facilitate behavioral adaptation to different situations.

Organisms have often been found to exhibit rhythmic neural activity that simultaneously occurs in different parts of the brain in a synchronized fashion. However, neuroscientists have not yet been able to determine whether this synchronized activity is important for specific brain functions or is merely a by-product of the way in which brain circuits are organized.

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