Proof that lying can be GOOD for you (honest!): How fibbing can improve your career, relationships and even your health

 

 

 

 

 

Ian Leslie reveals in his new book that lying is as innate to us as communication – and just as important to our survival.

We all know, of course, that liars are always other people. Lovers who have fallen out accuse one another of deceit; voters declare all politicians liars; the religious charge the godless with hating the truth, while atheists accuse churchgoers of perpetuating the biggest lie of all.

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What is ‘Social Jet Lag’? And How Does it Affect Health?

 

Do you go to bed later and sleep in on the weekends? If so, you may have what some researchers call “social jet lag.”

While it appears to be a harmless problem, a new study has associated it with poorer health, worse mood, and a greater feeling of sleepiness and fatigue. The research team also associated it with long-term health effects, such as an increased risk of heart disease.

 

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Cannabis users ‘are four times more likely to suffer a heart attack’

Regular cannabis users in their early 30s were 4.6 times more likely to have a cardiac illness. Researchers in Ohio found users were more likely to drink heavily (file photo)

Scientists say users suffer more cardiac-related illness than those who do not smoke the drug

  • Users in their late 20s were three times more likely to have a cardiac illness 
  • Most concerns over cannabis use are associated with mental health disorders 
  • Researchers in Ohio said users are tend to have higher blood pressures

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Telomere Growth Predicts Reduced Chance of Death from Heart Disease

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Short telomeres — the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes — have been previously linked to increased risk of death from heart disease. Now, research by scientists at UC San Francisco and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco has found that change in telomere length over time is also important: heart disease patients whose telomeres shrank over time had a worse short-term prognosis than those whose telomeres stayed stable, and those whose average telomere length grew over the course of the study had a higher chance of survival.

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