How “thinking about thinking” can help children in school and in life

In simple terms, metacognitive thinking teaches us about ourselves. According to Tamara Rosier, a learning coach who specializes in metacognitive techniques, thinking about our thinking creates a perspective that allows us to adapt and change to what the situation needs.

A simple example of metacognitive thinking (or reframing) is this:

“Math tests make me anxious.” This is a statement, a thought. Turning to metacognition, this train of thought evolves into “What about math tests make me anxious…and what can do I to change that?”

According to Rosier, children who are taught to think of themselves as being either “good” or “bad” at a particular task can end up with a fixed mindset that makes them passive in approaching a challenge relating to that task. However, teaching kids to become more metacognitive helps them develop a mindset that leaves more room for growth and adaptation, promoting self-awareness and resilience.

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Neurocientistas avaliaram as conexões cerebrais em associação aos índices de criatividade mensurados por testes psicológicos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neurocientistas avaliaram as conexões cerebrais em associação aos índices de criatividade mensurados por testes psicológicos. Eles não encontraram diferenças estatísticas na conectividade dentro dos hemisférios ou entre homens e mulheres. Entretanto, quando compararam as pessoas que pontuaram nos 15% superiores nos testes de criatividade com as dos 15% inferiores, aquelas com maior pontuação tiveram significativamente mais conexões entre os hemisférios direito e esquerdo. As diferenças estavam principalmente presentes entre os lobos frontais do cérebr. 🧠💡💭 Este tema será abordado no módulo Cognição & Funções Executivas da @mybrainuniversity

Referência: Durante, D., & Dunson, D. B. (2018). Bayesian Inference and Testing of Group Differences in Brain Networks. Bayesian Analysis, 13(1), 29-58. doi:10.1214/16-ba1030 (imagem autoral)


How to shift your mindset and choose your future

When it comes to big life problems, we often stand at a crossroads: either believe we’re powerless against great change, or we rise to meet the challenge. In an urgent call to action, political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac makes the case for adopting a mindset of “stubborn optimism” to confront climate change — or whatever crisis may come our way — and sustain the action needed to build a regenerative future. As he puts it: “Stubborn optimism can fill our lives with meaning and purpose.”

Transcript in English below:

 

00:13 – I never thought that I would be giving my TED Talk somewhere like this. But, like half of humanity, I’ve spent the last four weeks under lockdown due to the global pandemic created by COVID-19. I am extremely fortunate that during this time I’ve been able to come here to these woods near my home in southern England. These woods have always inspired me, and as humanity now tries to think about how we can find the inspiration to retake control of our actions so that terrible things don’t come down the road without us taking action to avert them, I thought this is a good place for us to talk. And I’d like to begin that story six years ago, when I had first joined the United Nations.

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Where in the brain does creativity come from? Evidence from jazz musicians

Playing guitar (stock image).Credit: © MIGUEL GARCIA SAAVED / Adobe Stock

According to a popular view, creativity is a product of the brain’s right hemisphere — innovative people are considered “right-brain thinkers” while “left-brain thinkers” are thought to be analytical and logical. Neuroscientists who are skeptical of this idea have argued that there is not enough evidence to support this idea and an ability as complex as human creativity must draw on vast swaths of both hemispheres. A new brain-imaging study out of Drexel University’s Creativity Research Lab sheds light on this controversy by studying the brain activity of jazz guitarists during improvisation. 

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We are born creative geniuses and the education system dumbs us down, according to NASA scientists

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our natural creative genius is stifled from the time we are born.

At TEDxTucson, Dr. George Land dropped a bombshell when he told his audience about the shocking result of a creativity test developed for NASA but subsequently used to test school children (see the full video below).

NASA had contacted Dr George Land and Beth Jarman to develop a highly specialized test that would give them the means to effectively measure the creative potential of NASA’s rocket scientists and engineers. The test turned out to be very successful for NASA’s purposes, but the scientists were left with a few questions: where does creativity come from? Are some people born with it or is it learned? Or does it come from our experience?

The scientists then gave the test to 1,600 children between the ages of 4 and 5. What they found shocked them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a test that looks at the ability to come up with new, different and innovative ideas to problems. What percentage of those children do you think fell in the genius category of imagination?

A full 98 percent!

It gets more interesting

But this is not the real story. The scientists were so astonished that they decided to make it a longitudinal study and tested the children again five years later when they were ten years old.

The result? Only 30 percent of the children now fell in the genius category of imagination.

When the kids were tested at 15 years the figure had dropped to 12 percent!

What about us adults? How many of us are still in contact with our creative genius after years of schooling?

Sadly, only 2 percent.

And for those who question the consistency of these results — or think they may be isolated incidences — these results have actually been replicated more than a million times, reports Gavin Nascimento whose article first alerted me to this amazing study and its shocking implication: that the school system, our education, robs us of our creative genius.

“The reasoning for this is not too difficult to apprehend; school, as we plainly call it, is an institution that has historically been put in place to ultimately serve the wants of the ruling class, not the common people.

“In order for the so-called elite to maintain their lavish life styles of overt luxury — where they contribute the least but enjoy the most — they understand that children must be dumbed down and brainwashed to accept (and even serve) their rapacious system of artificial scarcity, unending exploitation, and incessant war,” writes Nascimento.

What now? Can we recuperate our creativity?

Land says we have the ability to be at 98 percent if we want to. From what they found from the studies with children and from how brains work, there are two kinds of thinking that take place in the brain. Both use different parts of the brain and it’s a totally different kind of paradigm in the sense of how it forms something in our minds.

One is called divergent — that’s imagination, used for generating new possibilities. The other is called convergent — that’s when you’re making a judgement, you’re making a decision, you’re testing something, you’re criticizing, you’re evaluating.

So divergent thinking works like an accelerator and convergent thinking puts a brake on our best efforts.

“We found that what happens to these children, as we educate them, we teach them to do both kinds of thinking at the same time”, says Land.

When someone asks you to come up with new ideas, as you come up with them what you mostly learn at school is to immediately look and see: “We tried that before”, “That’s dumb idea”, “It won’t work” and so forth.

This is the point and this is what we must stop doing:

“When we actually looking inside the brain we find that neurons are fighting each other and actually diminishing the power of the brain because we’re constantly judging, criticizing and censoring,” says Land.

“If we operate under fear we use a smaller part of the brain, but when we use creative thinking the brain just lights up.”

What’s the solution?

We need to find that five-year old again. That capability that we as a five-year-old possessed, never goes away.

“That is something you exercise every day when you’re dreaming,” Land reminds us.

How do you go about finding that five-year-old?

Land challenges us all: Tomorrow, you take a table fork, turn your five-year-old on and come up with 25 or 30 ideas on how to improve on the table fork.

Link Original:https://ideapod.com/born-creative-geniuses-education-system-dumbs-us-according-nasa-scientists/