The hunt for the ‘angel particle’ continues

A 2017 report of the discovery of a particular kind of Majorana fermion — the chiral Majorana fermion, referred to as the “angel particle” — is likely a false alarm, according to new research. Majorana fermions are enigmatic particles that act as their own antiparticle and were first hypothesized to exist in 1937. They are of immense interest to physicists because their unique properties could allow them to be used in the construction of a topological quantum computer.

A team of physicists at Penn State and the University of Wurzburg in Germany led by Cui-Zu Chang, an assistant professor of physics at Penn State studied over three dozen devices similar to the one used to produce the angel particle in the 2017 report. They found that the feature that was claimed to be the manifestation of the angel particle was unlikely to be induced by the existence of the angel particle. A paper describing the research appears on January 3, 2020 in the journal Science.

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Tatuagem para diabéticos muda de cor, de acordo com os níveis de açúcar no sangue

Pesquisadores desenvolveram uma nova tinta de tatuagem que muda de cor que responde a mudanças no corpo, como açúcar no sangue e níveis de sódio.

Usando um líquido com biossensores em vez da tinta tradicional, os cientistas querem transformar a superfície da pele humana em uma “tela interativa” – uma idéia que torna essa prova de conceito emocionante de se assistir. Tecnologias como essa podem se tornar uma nova maneira revolucionária de monitorar a saúde.

O projeto, chamado DermalAbyss , é uma colaboração entre pesquisadores do MIT e da Harvard Medical School, combinando esforços da Fluid Interfaces e da biotecnologia.

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why biofabrication is the next industrial revolution?

What if we could “grow” clothes from microbes, furniture from living organisms and buildings with exteriors like tree bark? TED Fellow Suzanne Lee shares exciting developments from the field of biofabrication and shows how it could help us replace major sources of waste, like plastic and cement, with sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives.

Link Original: https://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_lee_why_biofabrication_is_the_next_industrial_revolution?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=button__2020-01-13&fbclid=IwAR2q_qtbqRo2XZcI-EjXkcE1NIXZbM2Lr3Tl9DoEEnYUSmbZ8l2VC6CF9sI



‘Time is elastic’: Why time passes faster atop a mountain than at sea level

The idea of ‘absolute time’ is an illusion. Physics and subjective experience reveal why.

  • Since Einstein posited his theory of general relativity, we’ve understood that gravity has the power to warp space and time.
  • This “time dilation” effect occurs even at small levels.
  • Outside of physics, we experience distortions in how we perceive time — sometimes to a startling extent.

Place one clock at the top of a mountain. Place another on the beach. Eventually, you’ll see that each clock tells a different time. Why? Time moves slower as you get closer to Earth, because, as Einstein posited in his theory of general relativity, the gravity of a large mass, like Earth, warps the space and time around it.

Scientists first observed this “time dilation” effect on the cosmic scale, such as when a star passes near a black hole. Then, in 2010, researchers observed the same effect on a much smaller scale, using two extremely precise atomic clocks, one placed 33 centimeters higher than the other. Again, time moved slower for the clock closer to Earth.

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Researchers build a particle accelerator that fits on a chip

On a hillside above Stanford University, the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory operates a scientific instrument nearly 2 miles long. In this giant accelerator, a stream of electrons flows through a vacuum pipe, as bursts of microwave radiation nudge the particles ever-faster forward until their velocity approaches the speed of light, creating a powerful beam that scientists from around the world use to probe the atomic and molecular structures of inorganic and biological materials.

Now, for the first time, scientists at Stanford and SLAC have created a that can accelerate electrons—albeit at a fraction of the velocity of that massive instrument—using an infrared laser to deliver, in less than a hair’s width, the sort of energy boost that takes microwaves many feet.

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Astrophysicist Says He Knows How to Build a Time Machine

Astrophysicist Ron Mallett believes he’s found a way to travel back in time — theoretically.

The tenured University of Connecticut physics professor recently told CNN that he’s written a scientific equation that could serve as the foundation for an actual time machine. He’s even built a prototype device to illustrate a key component of his theory — though Mallett’s peers remain unconvinced that his time machine will ever come to fruition.

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