How reading makes you more intelligent and empathic

Get lost in a good book. Time and again, reading has been shown to make us healthier, smarter, and more empathic.

Fitness headlines promise staggering physical results: a firmer butt, ripped abs, bulging biceps. Nutritional breakthroughs are similar clickbait, with attention-grabbing, if often inauthentic—what, really, is a “superfood?”—means of achieving better health. Strangely, one topic usually escaping discussion has been shown, time and again, to make us healthier, smarter, and more empathic animals: reading.

Reading, of course, requires patience, diligence, and determination. Scanning headlines and retweeting quips is not going to make much cognitive difference. If anything, such sweet nothings are dangerous, the literary equivalent of sugar addiction. Information gathering in under 140 characters is lazy. The benefits of contemplation through narrative offer another story.

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Intellectual humility: the importance of knowing you might be wrong

Why it’s so hard to see our own ignorance, and what to do about it.

Julia Rohrer wants to create a radical new culture for social scientists. A personality psychologist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Rohrer is trying to get her peers to publicly, willingly admit it when they are wrong.

To do this, she, along with some colleagues, started up something called the Loss of Confidence Project. It’s designed to be an academic safe space for researchers to declare for all to see that they no longer believe in the accuracy of one of their previous findings. The effort recently yielded a paper that includes six admissions of no confidence. And it’s accepting submissions until January 31.

“I do think it’s a cultural issue that people are not willing to admit mistakes,” Rohrer says. “Our broader goal is to gently nudge the whole scientific system and psychology toward a different culture,” where it’s okay, normalized, and expected for researchers to admit past mistakes and not get penalized for it.

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El Qutub es el jefe de todo el sistema Sufi: es el más iluminado de todos los Sufis, ha alcanzado el grado de Wasl (Unión con el Infinito) y tiene poder sobre, según algunos, todo el organismo Sufi. Otros dicen que el Qutub también tiene un considerable poder político o temporal. En cualquier caso, su identidad es conocida por unos pocos. Solamente mantiene comunicación con los Líderes de las Órdenes.

Las conferencias son llevadas a cabo telepáticamente, o bien mediante la “aniquilación del tiempo y del espacio”. Se dice que este último fenómeno significa que los Sufis del grado de Wasl pueden transportarse a cualquier lugar instantáneamente, en forma física, mediante un proceso de descorporealización.

El Qutub es asistido por cuatro diputados – los Awtád o Pilares – cuya función es mantener conocimiento de, y el poder sobre, los cuatro rincones de la tierra e informarle constantemente sobre el estado de los asuntos en cada país. Al servicio de los Awtád están los cuarenta Abdal (“aquellos que han cambiado espiritualmente”), y debajo de ellos los setenta Nobles, quienes a su vez están al mando de trescientos Señores. Los santos Sufis que no ocupan un cargo real en esta jerarquía son denominados Santos: Wali.

Magia oriental

La nueva edición ya está lista, incluyendo por primera vez todo el material fotográfico, en formato papel (blando y duro) + eBook. También, como siempre, lo puedes leer gratuitamente aquí:

https://idriesshahfoundation.org/es/books/oriental-magic/

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La jerarquía invisible del Sufismo / The invisible rulership of Sufism


We have recently released three new kid’s titles as part of the Books for Afghan Children Project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have recently released three new kid’s titles as part of the Books for Afghan Children Project. Printed with sumptuous illustrations, the English-language editions are being sold in limited editions. All proceeds go to making Afghan-language versions of the same books available for free to kids in Afghanistan. These would make a great holiday gift for the children in your life.

The new kids books are:

The Horrible Dib Dib

Written by Idries Shah for his own children when they were young, The Horrible Dib Dib is a masterful tale. A teaching story that challenges perceived ways of thought, it turns around in the mind long after it’s been read. Beautifully presented in a limited edition, the book’s sales in English go in entirety to providing copies of the same illustrated book, for children across Afghanistan.

The Tale of the Sands

One of the most poignant and powerful tales found in the East, The Tale of the Sands is told and retold in caravanserais, in souqs, and in dhows floating over the Arabian Sea. A story touched by the magic of raw imagination, it has the power to alter one’s thinking processes, and to consider what we know in new ways.

After A Swim

A cornerstone in an important charitable and cultural project, After A Swim is a tale that operates on many layers, bridging the traditional ways of thinking from the East, with those of the West. One of the most-loved stories told by Idries Shah, After A Swim has delighted children and adults in all corners of the world.

Link Original: https://isfshop.com/


We have recently released three new kid’s titles as part of the Books for Afghan Children Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have recently released three new kid’s titles as part of the Books for Afghan Children Project. Printed with sumptuous illustrations, the English-language editions are being sold in limited editions. All proceeds go to making Afghan-language versions of the same books available for free to kids in Afghanistan. These would make a great holiday gift for the children in your life.

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How oppressive and evil is a man who treats a flower with violence and indifference and does not appreciate her flower-life nature.

On the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against women, Khamenei.ir publishes excerpts from Ayatollah Khamenei’s statements on the status of women:

Islam has a very clear view of the family and women’s position in the family environment. There is a narration by the Holy Prophet (s.w.a.) which says, “Women are the lord at home.” The position of women in the family environment has been specified in the narrations of our infallible Imams (a.s.). “A woman is a flower and not a servant at home.” Islam tells men, “The best of you are those who treat their wives best.” These are the views of Islam, and there are many such views in Islam. However, practicing the Islamic view in the family environment is not possible through these narrations alone: it requires a legal guarantee and it is necessary to provide this guarantee. This has not been done over the past years. Faithful families and well-behaved and pious men have taken Islamic views into consideration. But in other cases, Islamic views have not been taken into consideration and women have been oppressed in the family.

Leader’s Speech to Prominent Iranian Women; May 22, 2011.

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I’m A Surgeon. Here’s What Happened When I Held My Patient’s Hand And Prayed For Her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several years ago, my business hit rock bottom. As a young, traditionally trained surgeon, I was taught the old surgery adage: “To cut is to cure.” Following this mantra early in my practice led me into a deep, dark hole. I had operated on many patients, but several of them were unhappy, and some had suffered complications. In the small town where I practiced, the word began to spread that perhaps I wasn’t a plastic surgeon worth seeing.

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