Too Many Wellness Trends? These 5 May Actually Change Your Life

Last year, we witnessed the least original evolution of trends. None of this should be surprising, trends are one way of making sense of our connection in a world of information overload, so it makes sense that many of 2019’s trends were just an evolution of 2018.

Just look: oat milk (almond milk’s cooler cousin), alcoholic seltzers (the younger La Croix), CBD (two mins away from the essential oil aisle), jumpsuits (fine, but Fleabag season 2 is character development from season 1, so actually I stand by this), and even astrology (a natural progression from 2018’s healing crystal trend).

So what’s going to be a big deal in 2020? Frankly it shouldn’t matter, because no body is like another, but there is joy in community and sharing and helping others find relief. So that’s what we, at Greatist, focused on when we curated this list.

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El ejercicio modifica cómo actúa el ADN

La actividad física se relaciona con cambios en la estructura del ADN sin modificar la secuencia de letras de los genes, su estructura primaria, de forma que impacta en cómo se expresa la información genética, según demuestra un estudio liderado por investigadores del Instituto Hospital del Mar de Investigaciones Médicas (IMIM).

El estudio, publicado en la revista ‘Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise’, destaca que realizar actividad de forma moderada-vigorosa, es decir, caminar a diario de forma rápida o practicar algún deporte durante, al menos 30 minutos, permite maximizar beneficios para la salud.

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‘It’s a superpower’: how walking makes us healthier, happier and brainier

Neuroscientist Shane O’Mara believes that plenty of regular walking unlocks the cognitive powers of the brain like nothing else. He explains why you should exchange your gym kit for a pair of comfy shoes and get strolling.

Taking a stroll with Shane O’Mara is a risky endeavour. The neuroscientist is so passionate about walking, and our collective right to go for walks, that he is determined not to let the slightest unfortunate aspect of urban design break his stride. So much so, that he has a habit of darting across busy roads as the lights change. “One of life’s great horrors as you’re walking is waiting for permission to cross the street,” he tells me, when we are forced to stop for traffic – a rude interruption when, as he says, “the experience of synchrony when walking together is one of life’s great pleasures”. He knows this not only through personal experience, but from cold, hard data – walking makes us healthier, happier and brainier.

We are wandering the streets of Dublin discussing O’Mara’s new book, In Praise of Walking, a backstage tour of what happens in our brains while we perambulate. Our jaunt begins at the grand old gates of his workplace, Trinity College, and takes in the Irish famine memorial at St Stephen’s Green, the Georgian mile, the birthplace of Francis Bacon, the site of Facebook’s new European mega-HQ and the salubrious seaside dwellings of Sandymount.

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