Astounding Quantum Physics Discoveries The Fourth Dimension Of Space Has Been Discovered

This theory has far-reaching implications and has changed our perceptions of space and time. What Physicists discovered is that we are all continuously moving not just in three-dimensional space but in four-dimensional spacetime. In a similar way, all objects in the real world are moving in a four-dimensional spacetime, at a constant velocity as that of light. Sounds astounding but it’s true.


Quantum Mechanics, the Mind-Body Problem and Negative Theology

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Scientists and philosophers should keep trying to solve realitie’s deepest riddles while accepting that they are unsolvable. By John Horgan – Dec. 2015

Here’s how I distinguish science from philosophy. Science addresses questions that can be answered, potentially, through empirical investigation. Examples: What’s the best way to defeat Covid-19? What causes schizophrenia, and how should it be treated? Can nuclear power help us overcome climate change? What are the causes of war, and how can we end it?

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3 Nobel-Prize Discoveries For Better Memory

How is it possible to remember our wedding day, but not where we left our glasses? Here’s the deal… The hippocampus part of the brain which transforms memories from short term to long term often becomes inflamed with age. This can lead to short-term memory loss, or frustrating “senior moments”. So what can be done? The answer comes down to 3 Nobel Prize-winning breakthroughs for better memory. One of them is the discovery of a protein called Nerve Growth Factor (or NGF), which has been shown to protect the brain from inflammation & help with age-related memory loss.It’s what Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini (103) used to obtain a greater mental capacity today than when she was 20 years old!Here’s how to easily boost it: 👉https://advbio.co/fb/amf-mb


Quantum Theory Proposes That Cause and Effect Can Go In Loops

Causality is one of those difficult scientific topics that can easily stray into the realm of philosophy.  Science’s relationship with the concept started out simply enough: an event causes another event later in time.  That had been the standard understanding of the scientific community up until quantum mechanics was introduced.  Then, with the introduction of the famous “spooky action at a distance” that is a side effect of the concept of quantum entanglement, scientists began to question that simple interpretation of causality

Now, researchers at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the University of Oxford have come up with a theory that further challenges that standard view of causality as a linear progress from cause to effect.  In their new theoretical structure, cause and effect can sometimes take place in cycles, with the effect actually causing the cause.

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Fractal Pattern in a Quantum Material Confirmed for the First Time!

The word fractal has become increasingly popular, although the concept started more than two centuries ago in the 17th century with prominent and prolific mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz. Leibnitz is believed to have addressed for the first time the notion of recursive self-similarity, and it wasn’t until 1960 that the concept was formally stabilized both theoretically and practically, through the mathematical development and computerized visualizations by Benoit Mandelbrot, who settled on the name “fractal”.


Fractals are defined mainly by three characteristics:

  1. Self-similarity: identical or very similar shapes and forms at all scales.
  2. Iteration: a recursive relationship limited only by computer capacity. With sufficiently high performance, the iterations could be infinite. This allows for very detailed shapes at every scale, that modify with respect to the first iteration, manifesting the original shape at some levels of iteration. Because of this, fractals may have emergent properties, which make them a suitable tool for complex systems.
  3. Fractal dimension, or fractional dimensions: describes the counter-intuitive notion that a measured length changes with the length of the measuring stick used; it quantifies how the number of scaled measuring sticks required to measure, for example, a coastline, changes with the scale applied to the stick.
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Test of wave function collapse suggests gravity is not the answer

A team of researchers from Germany, Italy and Hungary has tested a theory that suggests gravity is the force behind quantum collapse and has found no evidence to support it. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers describe underground experiments they conducted to test the impact of gravity on wave functions and what their work showed them. Myungshik Kim, with Imperial College London has published a News & Views piece in the same issue, outlining the work by the team and the implications of their results.

Quantum physics suggests that the state of an object depends on its properties and the way it is measured by an observer; the thought experiment involving Schrödinger’s cat is perhaps the most famous example. But the theory is not universally accepted—physicists have wrangled for many years over the notion, with some arguing that it seems a bit too anthropocentric to be real. Behind the theory is the concept of waveform collapse, by which the observation of a particle, as an example, makes it collapse. To help make sense of the idea, some physicists have suggested that the force behind waveform collapse is not a person taking a look at a particle, but gravity. They suggest that gravitational fields exist outside of quantum theory and resist being forced into awkward combinations such as superpositions. A gravitational fieldforced to do so soon collapses, taking the particle with it. In this new effort, the researchers devised an experiment to test this theory in a physical sense.

The experiment consisted of building a small crystal detector made from germanium and using it to detect gamma and X-ray emissions from protons in the nuclei of the germanium. But before running the experiment, they wrapped the detector in lead and dropped it into a facility 1.4 kilometers below ground level at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy to prevent as much extraneous radiation from reaching the sensor as possible. After two months of testing, the team recorded far fewer photon hits than theory would suggest—indicating that the particles were not collapsing due to gravity, as theory had suggested.

Link Original:https://phys.org/news/2020-09-function-collapse-gravity.html?fbclid=IwAR1ZyIvcm3jU0ZIDNpLtQO6oKrkOrQs28zE7TWilhlHrifT8EUHZglSoibs


Quantum Biology May Help Solve Some of Life’s Greatest Mysteries

In one of the University of Sheffield’s physics labs, a few hundred photosynthetic bacteria were nestled between two mirrors positioned less than a micrometer apart. Physicist David Coles and his colleagues were zapping the microbe-filled cavity with white light, which bounced around the cells in a way the team could tune by adjusting the distance between the mirrors. According to results published in 2017, this intricate setup caused photons of light to physically interact with the photosynthetic machinery in a handful of those cells, in a way the team could modify by tweaking the experimental setup.1

That the researchers could control a cell’s interaction with light like this was an achievement in itself. But a more surprising interpretation of the findings came the following year. When Coles and several collaborators reanalyzed the data, they found evidence that the nature of the interaction between the bacteria and the photons of light was much weirder than the original analysis had suggested. “It seemed an inescapable conclusion to us that indirectly what [we were] really witnessing was quantum entanglement,” says University of Oxford physicist Vlatko Vedral, a coauthor on both papers.

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The ‘X17’ particle: Scientists may have discovered the fifth force of nature

A new paper suggests that the mysterious X17 subatomic particle is indicative of a fifth force of nature.


Physicists have long known of four fundamental forces of nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force. 

Now, they might have evidence of a fifth force. 

The discovery of a fifth force of nature could help explain the mystery of dark matter, which is proposed to make up around 85 percent of the universe’s mass. It could also pave the way for a unified fifth force theory, one that joins together electromagnetic, strong and weak nuclear forces as “manifestations of one grander, more fundamental force,” as theoretical physicist Jonathan Feng put it in 2016.

The new findings build upon a study published in 2016 that offered the first hint of a fifth force.

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Simon El’evich Shnol is a biophysicist

Simon El’evich Shnol is a biophysicist, and a historian of Soviet science.

He is a professor at Physics Department of Moscow State University and a member of Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. His fields of interest are the oscillatory processes in biology, the theory of evolution, chronobiology, and the history of science. He has mentored many successful scientists, including Anatoly Zhabotinsky.One of the famous provisions of ibn-i arab. Shnol notices this in his experiments in the lab. Every moment of life is different and has a personality of itself, God is creating a brand new moment from the time to time.


Researchers realize efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation

In a study published in Physical Review Letters, a team led by academician Guo Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has made progress in high dimensional quantum teleportation. The researchers demonstrated the teleportation of high-dimensional states in a three-dimensional six-photon system.

To transmit unknown quantum states from one location to another, quantum teleportation is one of the key technologies to realize long-distance transmission.

Compared with two-dimensional systems, high-dimensional system quantum networks have the advantages of higher channel capacity and better security. In recent years more and more researchers of the quantum information field have been working on generating efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation to achieve efficient high-dimensional quantum networks.

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