Brain changed by caffeine in utero

Photo by fotografierende on Pexels.com

New research finds caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways in baby

Date:February 8, 2021Source:University of Rochester Medical CenterSummary:New research finds caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways that could lead to behavioral problems later in life. Researchers analyzed thousands of brain scans of nine and ten-year-olds, and revealed changes in the brain structure in children who were exposed to caffeine in utero.

New research finds caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways that could lead to behavioral problems later in life. Researchers in the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) analyzed thousands of brain scans of nine and ten-year-olds, and revealed changes in the brain structure in children who were exposed to caffeine in utero.

Leer Más

3 Nobel-Prize Discoveries For Better Memory

How is it possible to remember our wedding day, but not where we left our glasses? Here’s the deal… The hippocampus part of the brain which transforms memories from short term to long term often becomes inflamed with age. This can lead to short-term memory loss, or frustrating “senior moments”. So what can be done? The answer comes down to 3 Nobel Prize-winning breakthroughs for better memory. One of them is the discovery of a protein called Nerve Growth Factor (or NGF), which has been shown to protect the brain from inflammation & help with age-related memory loss.It’s what Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini (103) used to obtain a greater mental capacity today than when she was 20 years old!Here’s how to easily boost it: 👉https://advbio.co/fb/amf-mb



Frequent cannabis use by young people linked to decline in IQ


A study has found that adolescents who frequently use cannabis may experience a decline in Intelligence Quotient (IQ) over time. The findings of the research provide further insight into the harmful neurological and cognitive effects of frequent cannabis use on young people.

The paper, led by researchers at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences, is published in Psychological Medicine.

The results revealed that there were declines of approximately 2 IQ points over time in those who use cannabis frequently compared to those who didn’t use cannabis. Further analysis suggested that this decline in IQ points was primarily related to reduction in verbal IQ.

The research involved systematic review and statistical analysis on seven longitudinal studies involving 808 young people who used cannabis at least weekly for a minimum of 6 months and 5308 young people who did not use cannabis. In order to be included in the analysis each study had to have a baseline IQ score prior to starting cannabis use and another IQ score at follow-up. The young people were followed up until age 18 on average although one study followed the young people until age 38.

“Previous research tells us that young people who use cannabis frequently have worse outcomes in life than their peers and are at increased risk for serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia. Loss of IQ points early in life could have significant effects on performance in school and college and later employment prospects,” commented senior author on the paper Professor Mary Cannon, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology and Youth Mental Health, RCSI.

“Cannabis use during youth is of great concern as the developing brain may be particularly susceptible to harm during this period. The findings of this study help us to further understand this important public health issue,” said Dr Emmet Power, Clinical Research Fellow at RCSI and first author on the study.

The study was carried out by researchers from the Department of Psychiatry, RCSI and Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (Prof Mary Cannon, Dr Emmet Power, Sophie Sabherwal, Dr Colm Healy, Dr Aisling O’Neill and Professor David Cotter).

The research was funded by a YouLead Collaborative Doctoral Award from the Health Research Board (Ireland) and a European Research Council Consolidator Award.

Link Original: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210128134755.htm?fbclid=IwAR1Qrhejc9x-9uGRofHtmX8YX4E6qukoS7LIVMK8iwYvcaitU_RVCH4G_xo


Discovery of New Immune Cell Type May Unlock Strategies against Neurological Disorders and CNS Damage

Investigators at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and the University of Michigan, have identified in mice a new type of immune cell, which their in vivo studies showed can rescue damaged nerve cells from death and partially reverse nerve fiber damage. The scientists also identified a human immune cell line that exhibits similar characteristics, and which promotes nervous system repair.

They suggest that the findings may point to new strategies for enabling recovery from degenerative neurological diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as from damage caused by traumatic brain and spine injuries and stroke. “This immune cell subset secretes growth factors that enhance the survival of nerve cells following traumatic injury to the central nervous system,” said Benjamin Segal, MD, professor and chair of the department of neurology at the Ohio State College of Medicine and co-director of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center’s Neurological Institute. “It stimulates severed nerve fibers to regrow in the central nervous system, which is really unprecedented. In the future, this line of research might ultimately lead to the development of novel cell-based therapies that restore lost neurological functions across a range of conditions.”

Leer Más

Você sabia que em cada etapa de desenvolvimento, o cérebro 🧠 está mais ou menos receptivo para aprender certas coisas 🤔?.➡️ Durante a educação infantil, a criança aprende predominantemente através deexperiências chamadas de “concretas”, por isso utiliza seu corpo para mover-se, suas mãos para tocar e todos seus sentidos para experimentar o mundo 🌍. Os materiais pedagógicos utilizados nesta etapa devem remeter a criança à experiências reais, robustas e consistentes ✅..Estas experiências concretas serão a base para a etapa seguinte, onde elas utilizarão a parte mais mental do cérebro para abstrair e teorizar 💯..



Can Quantum Physics Explain Consciousness? One Scientist Thinks It Might

Fellow scientists labeled him a crackpot. Now Stuart Hameroff’s quantum consciousness theories are getting support from unlikely places.

By Steve VolkMarch 1, 2018 12:00 PM

Stuart-Hameroff

Anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff believes tiny structures in our cells called microtubules could explain consciousness. (Credit: Steve Craft)

Stuart Hameroff is an impish figure — short, round, with gray hair and a broad, gnomic face. His voice is smoke — deep and granular, rumbling with the weight of his 70 years. For more than two decades, he’s run a scientific conference on consciousness research. He turns up each day in rumpled jeans and short-sleeved shirts. The effect is casual bordering on slovenly. But up close, he is in charge, and to his critics, he comes off as pugnacious.

Leer Más

Are psi phenomena real? A study on precognition once exploded science

How a controversial study on psychic powers caused a revolution in psychology research.

Paul Ratner06 December, 2020

Are psi phenomena real? A study on precognition once exploded science

A 2011 study by psychologist Dr. Daryl Bem seemed to prove that ESP and other psychic phenomena may be real.The study caused tremendous controversy and catalyzed a re-examination of psychology research methods.Bem’s paper had many critics but its results were replicated in some later studies.

Leer Más