Discovery of New Immune Cell Type May Unlock Strategies against Neurological Disorders and CNS Damage

Investigators at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and the University of Michigan, have identified in mice a new type of immune cell, which their in vivo studies showed can rescue damaged nerve cells from death and partially reverse nerve fiber damage. The scientists also identified a human immune cell line that exhibits similar characteristics, and which promotes nervous system repair.

They suggest that the findings may point to new strategies for enabling recovery from degenerative neurological diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as from damage caused by traumatic brain and spine injuries and stroke. “This immune cell subset secretes growth factors that enhance the survival of nerve cells following traumatic injury to the central nervous system,” said Benjamin Segal, MD, professor and chair of the department of neurology at the Ohio State College of Medicine and co-director of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center’s Neurological Institute. “It stimulates severed nerve fibers to regrow in the central nervous system, which is really unprecedented. In the future, this line of research might ultimately lead to the development of novel cell-based therapies that restore lost neurological functions across a range of conditions.”

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Você sabia que em cada etapa de desenvolvimento, o cérebro 🧠 está mais ou menos receptivo para aprender certas coisas 🤔?.➡️ Durante a educação infantil, a criança aprende predominantemente através deexperiências chamadas de “concretas”, por isso utiliza seu corpo para mover-se, suas mãos para tocar e todos seus sentidos para experimentar o mundo 🌍. Os materiais pedagógicos utilizados nesta etapa devem remeter a criança à experiências reais, robustas e consistentes ✅..Estas experiências concretas serão a base para a etapa seguinte, onde elas utilizarão a parte mais mental do cérebro para abstrair e teorizar 💯..



Can Quantum Physics Explain Consciousness? One Scientist Thinks It Might

Fellow scientists labeled him a crackpot. Now Stuart Hameroff’s quantum consciousness theories are getting support from unlikely places.

By Steve VolkMarch 1, 2018 12:00 PM

Stuart-Hameroff

Anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff believes tiny structures in our cells called microtubules could explain consciousness. (Credit: Steve Craft)

Stuart Hameroff is an impish figure — short, round, with gray hair and a broad, gnomic face. His voice is smoke — deep and granular, rumbling with the weight of his 70 years. For more than two decades, he’s run a scientific conference on consciousness research. He turns up each day in rumpled jeans and short-sleeved shirts. The effect is casual bordering on slovenly. But up close, he is in charge, and to his critics, he comes off as pugnacious.

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Are psi phenomena real? A study on precognition once exploded science

How a controversial study on psychic powers caused a revolution in psychology research.

Paul Ratner06 December, 2020

Are psi phenomena real? A study on precognition once exploded science

A 2011 study by psychologist Dr. Daryl Bem seemed to prove that ESP and other psychic phenomena may be real.The study caused tremendous controversy and catalyzed a re-examination of psychology research methods.Bem’s paper had many critics but its results were replicated in some later studies.

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Supercomputer Aurora 21 will map the human brain, starting in 2021

Between your ears lies a miracle of nature, with more connections than our galaxy has stars. In the past, the idea of mapping the connectome—or the interconnected neuronal pathways of the brain (the white matter), was thought impossible. Now, a group of scientists are planning to do just that. How? They plan on using an oncoming supercomputer with tremendous power. Should they be successful, it could stand as one of the greatest achievements in the history of science. And that’s just one of the project’s scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are planning, with Aurora 21 (A21).

Intel, IBM, and other tech giants are currently working together to create this mind-blowing supercomputer that’ll run a quintillion operations simultaneously. This will be the first exascale supercomputer in the US. It’s set to go live in 2021. Originally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) reported a 2023 unveiling. But when China announced it was to have its own (exascale supercomputer) by 2020, the DOE stepped up its schedule. Those involved with the project say it’s humming along and should be completed on time.

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