Centenarian study suggests living environment may be key to longevity

When it comes to living to the ripe old age of 100, good genes help, but don’t tell the full story. Where you live has a significant impact on the likelihood that you will reach centenarian age, suggests a new study conducted by scientists at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

Published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health and based on Washington State mortality data, the research team’s findings suggest that Washingtonians who live in highly walkable, mixed-age communities may be more likely to live to their 100th birthday. They also found to be correlated, and an additional analysis showed that geographic clusters where the probability of reaching age is high are located in and smaller towns with higher socioeconomic status, including the Seattle area and the region around Pullman, Wash.

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The synchrony between neurons in different brain hemispheres could aid behavioral adaptation

In order to survive and thrive, humans and other living organisms must continuously acquire new strategies to adapt their behavior to changing environments. Past studies suggest that the synchronization between different brain cells could create flexible brain states that facilitate behavioral adaptation to different situations.

Organisms have often been found to exhibit rhythmic neural activity that simultaneously occurs in different parts of the brain in a synchronized fashion. However, neuroscientists have not yet been able to determine whether this synchronized activity is important for specific brain functions or is merely a by-product of the way in which brain circuits are organized.

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Al escuchar ruidos extraños en su casa, el Mulá se asustó y se escondió en un armario.
En el curso de su búsqueda, los dos ladrones abrieron la puerta y lo encontraron acurrucado allí.
“¿Por qué te estás escondiendo de nosotros?”, preguntó uno de ellos.
“Me escondo porque me siento avergonzado de que no haya nada en esta casa digno de vuestra atención”.
Las hazañas del incomparable Mulá Nasrudín

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Aqua-Fi: Underwater WiFi developed using LEDs and lasers

Aquatic internet that sends data through light beams could enable divers to instantly transmit footage from under the sea to the surface.

The internet is an indispensable communication tool, connecting tens of billions of devices worldwide, and yet we struggle to connect to the web from under water. “People from both academia and industry want to monitor and explore underwater environments in detail,” explains the first author, Basem Shihada. Wireless internet under the sea would enable divers to talk without hand signals and send live data to the surface.

Underwater communication is possible with radio, acoustic and visible light signals. However, radio can only carry data over short distances, while acoustic signals support long distances, but with a very limited data rate. Visible light can travel far and carry lots of data, but the narrow light beams require a clear line of sight between the transmitters and receivers.

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