Should YOU stop using deodorant to avoid breast cancer? Switzerland poised to be the first to BAN common antiperspirants because of health risk

  • With the introduction of a breast screening service in the late Eighties, more cancers are now detected, too. Some scientists are blaming antiperspirantsAluminium salts are used in deodorants to get rid of sweat and body odour
  • A recent Swiss study found salts can trigger the development of tumours
  • But British experts have spoken out against the ‘scaremongering’ research
  • Switzerland passed a bill on May 5 that will consider banning aluminium salts

Switzerland is poised to become the first country to ban deodorants with aluminium salts over fears they could cause breast cancer.

Concerns surrounding aluminium salts were first raised last September when Swiss scientists found exposure to the antiperspirants could trigger tumour growth.

Aluminium salts are present in the majority of high street deodorants and help get rid of sweat and body odour.

Now the Swiss National Council has approved a bill that could ban the use of aluminium salts in deodorants and fund research into its role in breast cancer.

With the introduction of a breast screening service in the late Eighties, more cancers are now detected, too. Some scientists are blaming antiperspirants

DO DEODORANTS CAUSE CANCER?

A study published in September found there may be an increased risk of breast cancer caused by aluminium compounds in antiperspirants.

These compounds temporarily block sweat glands – but can build up in breast tissue and produce some oestrogen-like effects.

While some simple deodorants designed just to mask odour do not contain them, most do.

André-Pascal Sappino, co-author of the study, from the University of Geneva, looked at isolated human mammary cells and later replicated it in studies on mice.

The study found long term exposure resulted in tumours which metastasise – or spread.

But many leading experts have pointed out flaws in the Swiss study and said there is no need to ban deodorants with aluminum salts.

Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive of the charity Breast Cancer Now, said women should not stop using these products, pointing out a major flaw in the study –  which looked at how aluminium salts affected breast tissue in mice, not humans.

Cancer Research UK’s website described headlines about the study as ‘scaremongering’, and Carl Alexander, the charity’s health information officer, said: ‘There’s no firm evidence that aluminium in deodorants could increase people’s risk of cancer.

On May 5 the Council voted by 126 to 58 to approve the bill, which was brought about by Green MP Lisa Mazzone.

Mazzone claims that previous research by scientists from the University of Geneva has created ‘sufficient doubt’ around the safety of aluminium salts, the Hippocratic Post reported.

But many leading experts have pointed out flaws in the Swiss study and said there is no need to ban deodorants with aluminum salts.

Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive of the charity Breast Cancer Now, said women should not stop using these products, pointing out a major flaw in the study – which looked at how aluminium salts affected breast tissue in mice, not humans.

But the MP said antiperspirants containing aluminium compounds should be banned as a ‘precautionary’ measure.

The study published in September found there may be an increased risk of breast cancer caused by aluminium compounds in antiperspirants.

These compounds temporarily block sweat glands – but can also build up in breast tissue and produce some oestrogen-like effects.

While some simple deodorants designed just to mask odour do not contain them, most do.

André-Pascal Sappino, co-author of the study, from the University of Geneva, looked at isolated human mammary cells and later replicated it in studies on mice.

The study found long term exposure resulted in tumours which metastasise – or spread.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4484782/Switzerland-seeks-BAN-deodorants-aluminium-salts.html#ixzz4gvSQ3CJ2
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s