What is Poison?

He replied with a beautiful answer – Anything which is more than our necessity is Poison. It may be Power, Wealth, Hunger, Ego, Greed, Laziness, Love, Ambition, Hate or anything

What is fear…..?

Non acceptance of uncertainty.

If we accept that uncertainty, it becomes adventure…!

What is envy ?

Non acceptance of good in othersIf we accept that good, it becomes inspiration…!

What is Anger?

Non acceptance of things which are beyond our control.If we accept, it becomes tolerance…!

What is hatred?

Non acceptance of person as he is. If we accept person unconditionally, it becomes love…!

Rumi´s anwer to questions asked by a disciple


Does Information Carry Mass?

If information carries mass, could it be the dark matter physicists are craving?

The existence of dark energy and dark matter was inferred in order to correctly predict the expansion of the universe and the rotational velocity of galaxies. In this view, dark energy could be the source of the centrifugal force expanding the universe (it is what accounts for the Hubble constant in the leading theories), while dark matter could be the centripetal force (an additional gravity source) necessary to stabilize galaxies and clusters of galaxies, since there isn’t enough ordinary mass to keep them together. Among other hypotheses, dark energy and dark matter are believed to be related to the vacuum fluctuations, and huge efforts have been devoted to detecting it. The fact that no evidence has yet been found calls for a change of perspective that could be due to information theory.

How could we measure the mass of information?
Dr. Melvin Vopson, of the University of Portsmouth, has a hypothesis he calls the mass-energy-information equivalence. It extends the already existing information-energy equivalence by proposing information has mass. Initial works on Shannon’s classical information theory, its applications to quantum mechanics by Dr. Wheeler, and Landauer’s principle predicting that erasing one bit of information would release a tiny amount of heat, connect information to energy. Therefore, through Einstein’s equivalence between mass and energy, information – once created – has mass. The figure below depicts the extended equivalence principle.

In order to find the mass of digital information, one would start with an empty data storage device, measuring its total mass with a highly sensitive device. Once the information is recorded in the device, its mass is measured again. The next step is to erase one file and measure again. The limiting step is the fact that such an ultra-sensitive device doesn’t exist yet. In his paper published in the journal AIP Advances, Vopson proposes that this device could be in the form of an interferometer similar to LIGO, or a weighing machine like a Kibble balance. In the same paper, Vopson describes the mathematical basis for the mechanism and physics by which information acquires mass, and formulates this powerful principle, proposing a possible experiment to test it.

In regard to dark matter, Vopson says that his estimate of the ‘information bit content’ of the universe is very close to the number of bits of information that the visible universe would contain to make up all the missing dark matter, as estimated by M.P. Gough and published in 2008,.

This idea is synchronistic with the recent discovery that sound carries mass (https://resonancefdn.oldrsf.com/sound-has-mass-and-thus-gravity/), i.e., phonons are massive.

Vopson is applying for a grant in order to design and build the measurement device and perform the experiments. We are so looking forward to his results!

RSF in perspective

Both dark matter and dark energy have been inferred as a consequence of neglecting spin in the structure of space-time. In the frame of the Generalized Holographic approach, spin is the natural source of centrifugal and centripetal force that emerges from the gradient density across scales, just as a hurricane emerges due to pressure and temperature gradients. The vacuum energy of empty space – the classical or cosmological vacuum – has been estimated to be 10−9 joules per cubic meter. However, vacuum energy density at quantum scale is 10113joules per cubic meter. Such a discrepancy of 122 orders of magnitude difference in vacuum densities between micro and cosmological scales is known as the vacuum catastrophe. This extremely large density gradient in the Planck field originates spin at all scales.

Additionally, the holographic model explains mass as an emergent property of an information transfer potential between the information-energy stored in a confined volume and the information-energy in the surface or boundary of that volume, with respect to the size or volume of a bit of information. Each bit of information-energy voxelating the surface and volume is spinning at an extremely fast speed. Space is composed of these voxels, named Planck Spherical Units (PSU), which are a quanta of action. The expressed or unfolded portion of the whole information is what we call mass. For more details on how the holographic approach explains dark mass and dark energy, please see our RSF article on the Vacuum Catastrophe (https://resonance.is/the-vacuum-catastrophe/).

Link original:https://www.resonancescience.org/blog/does-information-carry-mass?fbclid=IwAR2gkGFxUvbzGW4bq5nP-M9b6lBVwPX6xBoE9xf3aSS5qm6lG60C7B6Rqhc


A unique brain signal may be the key to human intelligence

Though progress is being made, our brains remain organs of many mysteries. Among these are the exact workings of neurons, with some 86 billion of them in the human brain. Neurons are interconnected in complicated, labyrinthine networks across which they exchange information in the form of electrical signals. We know that signals exit an individual neuron through a fiber called an axon, and also that signals are received by each neuron through input fibers called dendrites.

Understanding the electrical capabilities of dendrites in particular — which, after all, may be receiving signals from countless other neurons at any given moment — is fundamental to deciphering neurons’ communication. It may surprise you to learn, though, that much of everything we assume about human neurons is based on observations made of rodent dendrites — there’s just not a lot of fresh, still-functional human brain tissue available for thorough examination.

For a new study published January 3 in the journal Science, however, scientists got a rare chance to explore some neurons from the outer layer of human brains, and they discovered startling dendrite behaviors that may be unique to humans, and may even help explain how our billions of neurons process the massive amount of information they exchange.

A PUZZLE, SOLVED?

Electrical signals weaken with distance, and that poses a riddle to those seeking to understand the human brain: Human dendrites are known to be about twice as long as rodent dendrites, which means that a signal traversing a human dendrite could be much weaker arriving at its destination than one traveling a rodent’s much shorter dendrite. Says paper co-author biologist Matthew Larkum of Humboldt University in Berlin speaking to LiveScience, “If there was no change in the electrical properties between rodents and people, then that would mean that, in the humans, the same synaptic inputs would be quite a bit less powerful.” Chalk up another strike against the value of animal-based human research. The only way this would not be true is if the signals being exchanged in our brains are not the same as those in a rodent. This is exactly what the study’s authors found.

The researchers worked with brain tissue sliced for therapeutic reasons from the brains of tumor and epilepsy patients. Neurons were resected from the disproportionately thick layers 2 and 3 of the cerebral cortex, a feature special to humans. In these layers reside incredibly dense neuronal networks.

Without blood-borne oxygen, though, such cells only last only for about two days, so Larkum’s lab had no choice but to work around the clock during that period to get the most information from the samples. “You get the tissue very infrequently, so you’ve just got to work with what’s in front of you,” says Larkum. The team made holes in dendrites into which they could insert glass pipettes. Through these, they sent ions to stimulate the dendrites, allowing the scientists to observe their electrical behavior.

In rodents, two type of electrical spikes have been observed in dendrites: a short, one-millisecond spike with the introduction of sodium, and spikes that last 50- to 100-times longer in response to calcium.

In the human dendrites, one type of behavior was observed: super-short spikes occurring in rapid succession, one after the other. This suggests to the researchers that human neurons are “distinctly more excitable ” than rodent neurons, allowing them to successfully traverse our longer dendrites.

In addition, the human neuronal spikes — though they behaved somewhat like rodent spikes prompted by the introduction of sodium — were found to be generated by calcium, essentially the opposite of rodents.

AN EVEN BIGGER SURPRISE

The study also reports a second major finding. Looking to better understand how the brain utilizes these spikes, the team programmed computer models based on their findings. (The brains slices they’d examined could not, of course, be put back together and switched on somehow.)

The scientists constructed virtual neuronal networks, each of whose neurons could could be stimulated at thousands of points along its dendrites, to see how each handled so many input signals. Previous, non-human, research has suggested that neurons add these inputs together, holding onto them until the number of excitatory input signals exceeds the number of inhibitory signals, at which point the neuron fires the sum of them from its axon out into the network.

However, this isn’t what Larkum’s team observed in their model. Neurons’ output was inverse to their inputs: The more excitatory signals they received, the less likely they were to fire off. Each had a seeming “sweet spot” when it came to input strength.

What the researchers believe is going on is that dendrites and neurons may be smarter than previously suspected, processing input information as it arrives. Mayank Mehta of UC Los Angeles, who’s not involved in the research, tells LiveScience, “It doesn’t look that the cell is just adding things up — it’s also throwing things away.” This could mean each neuron is assessing the value of each signal to the network and discarding “noise.” It may also be that different neurons are optimized for different signals and thus tasks.

Much in the way that octopuses distribute decision-making across a decentralized nervous system, the implication of the new research is that, at least in humans, it’s not just the neuronal network that’s smart, it’s all of the individual neurons it contains. This would constitute exactly the kind of computational super-charging one would hope to find somewhere in the amazing human brain.

Link Original:https://bigthink.com/neuropsych/human-neuron-signals/#Echobox=1629474922



Un erudito preguntó al gran sabio Afzal de Iskandariya:“¿Qué puedes decirme de Alim Azimi, tu maestro, a quien atribuyes cualidades que te han moldeado?”Afzal respondió:“Su poesía me intoxicaba, su amor a la humanidad me inundaba, y su abnegación en el servicio me alborozaba.”El erudito dijo:“¡Tal hombre ciertamente sería capaz de moldear ángeles!”Afzal continuó:“Esas son las cualidades que Alim te habría recomendado a ti. Por lo que respecta a las cualidades que lo capacitaron para ayudar a los hombres a trascender lo ordinario, Hazrat Alim Azimi me irritaba, lo cual hizo que examinase mi irritación para averiguar su origen. Alim Azimi me encolerizaba de modo que yo pudiese sentir y transformar mi cólera. Alim Azimi permitía que lo atacasen, de modo que la gente pudiese ver la bestialidad de sus atacantes y no unirse a ellos. Él nos mostraba lo extraño, para que lo extraño se convirtiese en común y nos pudiéramos dar cuenta de lo que ello realmente es.

”La exploración dérmica

Link Original: Puedes leer el libro, gratis, aquí:http://idriesshahfoundation.org/…/la-exploracion-dermica/

Lo extraño se convierte en común



Quantum entanglement realized between distant large objects

Light propagates through the atomic cloud shown in the center and then falls onto the SiN membrane shown on the left. As a result of interaction with light the precession of atomic spins and vibration of the membrane become quantum correlated. This is the essence of entanglement between the atoms and the membrane. Credit: Niels Bohr Institute

A team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen’s Niels Bohr Institute has successfully entangled two very distinct quantum particles. The findings, which were reported in Nature Physics, have various possible applications in ultra-precise sensing and quantum communication.

Quantum communication and quantum sensing are both based on entanglement. It’s a quantum link between two items that allows them to act as if they’re one quantum object.

Researchers were able to create entanglement between a mechanical oscillator—a vibrating dielectric membrane—and a cloud of atoms, each serving as a small magnet, or «spin,» according to physicists. By joining these disparate entities with photons, or light particles, they were able to entangle. The membrane—or mechanical quantum systems in general—can be used to process quantum information, and the membrane—or mechanical quantum systems in general—can be used to store quantum information.

Professor Eugene Polzik, the project’s leader, says: «We’re on our way to pushing the boundaries of entanglement’s capabilities with this new technique. The larger the objects, the further away they are, and the more different they are, the more intriguing entanglement becomes from both a basic and an applied standpoint. Entanglement between highly diverse things is now conceivable thanks to the new result.»

Imagine the position of the vibrating membrane and the tilt of the total spin of all atoms, similar to a spinning top, to explain entanglement using the example of spins entangled with a mechanical membrane. A correlation occurs when both items move randomly yet are observed travelling right or left at the same moment. The so-called zero-point motion—the residual, uncorrelated motion of all matter that occurs even at absolute zero temperature—is generally the limit of such correlated motion. This limits our understanding of any of the systems.

Eugene Polzik’s team entangled the systems in their experiment, which means they moved in a correlated way with more precision than zero-point motion. «Quantum mechanics is a double-edged sword—it gives us amazing new technology, but it also restricts the precision of measurements that would appear simple from a classical standpoint,» explains Micha Parniak, a team member. Even if they are separated by a large distance, entangled systems can maintain perfect correlation, a fact that has perplexed academics since quantum physics’ inception more than a century ago.

Christoffer stfeldt, a Ph.D. student, elaborates: «Consider the many methods for manifesting quantum states as a zoo of diverse realities or circumstances, each with its own set of features and potentials. If, for example, we want to construct a gadget that can take advantage of the many attributes they all have and perform different functions and accomplish different tasks, we’ll need to invent a language that they can all understand. For us to fully utilise the device’s capabilities, the quantum states must be able to communicate. This entanglement of two zoo elements has demonstrated what we are presently capable of.»

Quantum sensing is an example of distinct perspectives on entangling different quantum things. Different objects have different levels of sensitivity to external pressures. Mechanical oscillators, for example, are employed in accelerometers and force sensors, while atomic spins are used in magnetometers. Entanglement permits only one of the two entangled objects to be measured with a sensitivity not restricted by the object’s zero-point fluctuations when only one of the two is subject to external perturbation.

The approach has the potential to be used in sensing for both small and large oscillators in the near future. The first detection of gravity waves, performed by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, was one of the most significant scientific breakthroughs in recent years (LIGO). LIGO detects and monitors extremely faint waves produced by deep-space astronomical events such as black hole mergers and neutron star mergers. The waves can be seen because they shake the interferometer’s mirrors. However, quantum physics limits LIGO’s sensitivity since the laser interferometer’s mirrors are likewise disturbed by zero-point fluctuations. These variations produce noise, which makes it impossible to see the tiny movements of the mirrors induced by gravitational waves.

It is theoretically possible to entangle the LIGO mirrors with an atomic cloud and so cancel the reflectors’ zero-point noise in the same manner that the membrane noise is cancelled in the current experiment. Due to their entanglement, the mirrors and atomic spins have a perfect correlation that can be used in such sensors to almost eliminate uncertainty. It’s as simple as taking data from one system and applying what you’ve learned to the other. In this method, one may simultaneously learn about the position and momentum of LIGO’s mirrors, entering a so-called quantum-mechanics-free subspace and moving closer to unlimited precision in motion measurements. A model experiment demonstrating this principle is on the way at Eugene Polzik’s laboratory.

Link original: https://www.sciandnature.com/2022/01/quantum-entanglement-realized-between.html?fbclid=IwAR2RyzFbzEcknG2KeoBoJo7TY4wzVHpjKqFRjbI57OxqMVexRiObG-wwh8c


5 meta-skills to supercharge every aspect of your life

Being a specialist used to be the way forward, but the future belongs to people who can adapt to any given scenario on a dime.

It used to be the case that learning a particular trade or skill meant you could land a reliable career. These days, however, constant learning is both expected and required to stay afloat. Rather than developing competency in, say, analysis or communication, modern life demands that we become more agile and able to shift on a dime towards the particular skills that challenges require.

That is why cultivating meta-skills is so important. Meta-skills are broad capabilities that help you to develop other skills and can be applied across a wide variety of domains. As more jobs become automated, possessing these skills will be more important than ever. 

Author Marty Neumeier makes the case for investing in five particular meta-skills in his book, Meta-skills: Five Talents for the Robotic Age: Feeling, Seeing, Dreaming, Making, and Learning.

1. FEELING

Just because the future of work lies in automation doesn’t mean that the human element will be taken out of the equation. Social intelligence is going to be an even more important skill than before — with technology outperforming our more analytical talents, individuals with more empathy and other uniquely human gifts are going to bring the most value to the table.

Feeling doesn’t just refer to interpersonal skills; it also covers qualities like intuition, or the ability to arrive at a conclusion without relying on conscious reasoning. The human mind wasn’t designed to do rigorous calculations. It was, however, designed to use heuristics to quickly arrive at likely solutions that serve us well enough most of the time. Learning to lean on this skill more will help you work with others and save time and effort when developing solutions.

2. SEEING

Computers are fantastic are addressing individual problems, but they don’t do so well at addressing the big picture. This meta-skill captures humanity’s ability to strategize, to understand how the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts, and to escape biases.

It’s certainly easier to simplify things done to dichotomies, but the real world is complicated and multi-dimensional. Becoming better at seeing things isn’t quite so easy and can challenge your beliefs, but doing so provides a more accurate representation of the world. In turn, seeing better provides better information to act on when navigating the modern world.

3. DREAMING

Innovation, creativity, generative talent — these skills will always be in high demand. Once rigorous, linear work is outsourced to machines, the less precise and more fanciful talents of the human mind will become the primary characteristic that employers look for.

The antithesis of this meta-skill is the idea that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. It’s true that being original and trying to innovate carries risk. Your innovation might fail, or it might make things worse, but nothing is going to be improved without taking that risk on. Settling for tried-and-true solutions also means settling for mediocrity.

4. MAKING

Neumeier characterizes this meta-skill as primarily being related to design and design thinking. “Design thinking is a generative approach to solving problems,” he says. “In other words, you create answers, you don’t find answers.”

Making overlaps with dreaming to a certain extent, but its key distinction lies in the prototyping and testing of generated solutions. Rather than seeking safety and assurance in pre-existing answers, talented makers are unafraid of the messy process of producing an original solution. It’s this ability to navigate uncertain scenarios and tolerate ambiguity that makes this such a valuable and powerful meta-skill.

5. LEARNING

Neumeier describes this as the “opposable thumb” of meta-skills. Learning how to learn enables you to improve every skill in your life. Gone are the days when a 4-year degree was all you needed to excel in the world. Nowadays, constant learning is a fact of life. This doesn’t have to be laborious — not only does learning lead to greater value, but learning itself can be an intrinsically rewarding activity.

Becoming better at this skill doesn’t mean that you have to learn a subject like mathematics, for example, if you hate it. Rather, talented learners find the subjects that bring them joy and dive into them. Doing this regularly will make you more curious and hungry to learn about other topics that you may not have cared for originally.

These five meta-skills inform nearly every talent and capacity that we exercise in our daily lives. Moreover, they aren’t going to be automated anytime soon. As rapidly as technology is advancing, it’s still a far cry from the curious abilities that millions of years of evolution have gifted us with. Taking advantage of these natural and uniquely human skills is the best way to stay relevant in the changing world.

Link Original: https://bigthink.com/smart-skills/5-meta-skills/#Echobox=1640843426


Si uno ama a alguien porque eso causa placer, uno no debería considerar que está amando a esa persona en absoluto. En realidad, y aunque esto no sea percibido, el amor está dirigido hacia el placer. La fuente del placer es el objeto secundario de atención, y es percibido solamente debido a que la percepción del placer no está lo suficientemente desarrollada para que el sentimiento verdadero sea identificado y descripto.

El camino del Sufi

Link original: La nueva traducción ya está disponible en formato tradicional, tanto en tapa blanda y dura, y por primera vez como eBook. Pronto también estará disponible el audiolibro. Como siempre, puedes leerlo en nuestro sitio, gratis. https://idriesshahfoundation.org/…/the-way-of-the-sufi/

AMOR E INTERÉS PROPIO


Oh soul, you worry too much. You have seen your own strength. You have seen your own beauty. You have seen your golden wings. Of anything less, why do you worry? You are in truth the soul, of the soul, of the soul.~

Rumi

OH SOUL